Category Archives: execution

Execution – getting things done. Consistently, well, and as expected when expected

Antelope or Mouse?

antelope-not-mice

From: https://www.reddit.com/r/GetMotivated/

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Indecision is the Enemy

Indecision is the enemy

[this is  a summer report series repost]

We often feel as though things look like this: 360 degrees of choices. “What if I pick the wrong thing and then I’m headed in the wrong direction?”

But really, deciding where to start is the enemy of starting. The thing you pick doesn’t have to be the thing you do for the rest of your life. (Hint: it probably won’t be.) But you have no idea how the things you learn now will benefit what you end up doing in the future.

You can’t steer a parked car. Pivot as needed. Pick an option and go! Starting is progress. Indecision is the enemy.

— I’d love to know who wrote this. If you know the source please drop me a line and clue me in.

Advice to Millennials is Advice to Everybody

Good advice for millennials, good advice for everyone. It’s not good enough anymore to just be good at your job. The companies that succeed are the ones that figure out what collaboration really means.

Five Exceptionally Powerful Ways Millennials Succeed at Work

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Four Things That Kill Companies

John Spence talks about the four things he sees most often holding back his clients. If I were to simplify it even further it would be the “lack of focus” and “lack of talent”. Without those two you can’t address the others…

…and first is focus. Without a focus – who are you going to hire?

Four Things That Kill Companies

Get Them as Spurred as Angry Birds

Why are online games so addictive? And what can we learn about motivating people from them?

Here’s why all jobs should mimic angry birds

When You Hit the Complexity Ceiling

There is a predictable obstacle to company growth that most companies hit the 15-20 employee milestone. Be ready for it.

Track and Post – Setting Goals that Get Done #5

My niece, who I’m very proud of, recently completed her last year of gymnastics competition. She had a full-ride scholarship to the University of Illinois in Chicago. After winning her senior competition (and posting a personal best score), she went on to state championships (another personal best) and regional. All while maintaining a 4.0 GPA.

I tell you this because I want you to imagine how successful she would have been if her coach had – instead of daily if not minute-by-minute feedback on the gym floor – given her quarterly or yearly performance reviews? How successful she would have been if her teachers hadn’t told her what her marks on her papers were until the end of the semester?

She had big goals (win competitions, keep a high GPA), broke them down into specific, actionable milestones (get better at balance beam so I can score well in the March competition for example), and worked hard every day with feedback from her coaches to improve.

I also know that every member of the team knew where they stood every day as far as their personal best score, and their rankings in the NCAA that week, and what their best routine was.

That kind of “track and post”, where progress towards a goal is posted and visible – whether it’s a personal goal, or a team environment – actually improves your chances of success. Of course if you have a goal, you are more likely to be successful at it. Of course if you get accurate, timely feedback, you’re going to get better.

But if you do both together, both set a goal and get accurate, timely feedback, you more than double your chance of reaching that goal.

And remember, when you’re the manager, the job of providing that accurate, timely feedback falls to you.

Sometimes You Just Have to Get Started – Setting Goals That Get Done #4

Part Three of  Series that begins with Setting Your Intent and Deciding What You’re Not Going To Do

Castle Mountain, Alberta

Forget the first step, what’s the next step? And what tune are you going to sing to keep the pace?

If we never started something knowing 100% how we were going to get it done, humankind wouldn’t have reached the moon, mapped the human genome, or climbed Mount Everest.  Sometime the best way to do something is to just start and figure it out along the way. You might not be able to figure out the entire puzzle, but you can usually figure out where the next piece fits.

If you know what needs to be done next, even if that means ‘figure out how to do that part”, then that’s enough to get started.

Here’s the key: When I say “next step”, I mean what physical, tangible, visible action are you going to take? Are you going to pick up the phone and call somebody, or sketch out the design, or visualize what the deliverable / goal / accomplishment looks like and commit that paper? Are you going to cut, shape, fabricate a component? It’s shape model? A part? Are you going to have the contract reviewed by a lawyer, sign it, and hang your shingle out? Start a web page, order stock, arrange a photographer?

What are you going to do? What is the thing that is going to happen?

Here’s an exercise of for extra points: List your three biggest, or most important, projects. Then list the next step for each.

Next: Track and Post

Emmett’s Law

The dread of doing a task uses up more time and energy than doing the task itself ~ Emmett’s Law

I’ll Do It Tomorrow

Think of all the years passed by in which you said to yourself “I’ll do it tomorrow,” and how the gods have again and again granted you periods of grace which you have not availed yourself. It is time to realize that you are a member of the Universe, that you are born of Nature itself, and to know that a limit has been set to your time

Marcus Aurelius

Marcus Aurelius